AcousticByLines Quotes, Jokes, Stories

Quotes, Jokes, Stories

Please don't read these pages if you are easily offended.

Music Quotes - 2009 and before

"...we live different life times within our own lives. And a lot of it is defined by the music you listen to—especially when you're a teenager." Evan Schlansky, "THE SCHLANSKY FILES: Reliving Woodstock," American Songwriter, Nov / Dec 2009

"The healing power of music is vast. Music therapy is in its infancy in Western psychology. If we knew more, we'd be able to do amazing things, and maybe even make permanent changes in the brain's mysterious workings. With a simple song and four chords, you might be able to do something useful, even life-changing. With all the songs you know, you might be a virtual, veritable medicine chest for the right person." — Gary Talley, "Guitar 101: Hear Those Jingle Bells?," American Songwriter, Nov / Dec 2009

"The power of the riff compels me." — seen on a bumper sticker

"I didn't know you had to practice to play the bass." — actual quote passed on by Rich Moore

Goren: "He had a new [song], 'Transference BeBop.' ...He was seeing a therapist."
Eames: "He would have done better to see a lyricist." — Law & Order: Criminal Intent

"I think first CDs should be called 'Finally!' and second CDs should be called 'Already?' or 'Again?'." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Sandy Reay Sandy Reay: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"I'd like to give you notice about an upcoming musical (we hope) event [we] will be playing.... There is a cover charge of $3 (hopefully the economic downturn has still left some of you with enough funds to contribute to the band's coffers - or sneezers and belchers if you prefer)." — Peter Schwimmer Peter Schwimmer: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"For those out there who are mainly interested in the bluegrass shows I am playing, I apologize for the notice about the jazz events, but who knows, if you come to the show, you might pick up some "new notes" (from some of the guys' playing) that you can to put into your bluegrass solos, that will have traditionalists scratching their heads in amazement. Of course they might just have been scratching due to wondering why you ever wanted to "ruin" a perfectly good bluegrass tune with those "new notes", or perhaps they just came back from the Tygh Valley Bluegrass Festival and were scratching where they got bit by ticks." — Peter Schwimmer Peter Schwimmer: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and life to everything." — Plato

"'Heartache' is a state not usually associated with a 'close sexual and emotional relationship,' unless you're talking about a Tammy Wynette song." — Amy Dickinson, "Ask Amy," The Denver Post, August 5, 2009

"Music is love in search of a word." — Lanier (printed on a pillow)

"In our culture, we have such respect for musical instruments; they are like part of God." — Indian musician Ravi Shankar, "Celebrity Cipher," The Denver Post, June 4, 2009

"What we play is life." — Louis Armstrong

Jazz quotes:

  • "I wish you wouldn't make the strings such an important part of your arrangements because frankly they're only a tax dodge!" — Tommy Dorsey (to arranger Nelson Riddle)
  • "Tastes are created by the business interests. How else can you explain the popularity of Al Hirt?" — Charles Mingus
  • "The outer space beings are my brothers. They sent me here. They already know my music." — Sun Ra
  • "Jazz is the folk music of the machine age." — Paul Whiteman
  • "Are big bands coming back? Sure, every football season." — Woody Herman
  • "Blues is to jazz what yeast is to bread—without it, it's flat." — Carmen McCrae
  • "Giving jazz the Congressional seal of approval is a little like making Huck Finn an honorary Boy Scout." — Melvin Maddocks
  • "I don't want no drummer. I set the tempo." — Bessie Smith
  • "I am the world's laziest writer." — Oscar Peterson
  • "If someone has been escaping reality, I don't expect him to dig my music." — Charles Mingus
  • "Miles was a soul man, a sound, a black Humphrey Bogart. He was also an insufferable prick." — Albert Goldman
  • "It's taken me all my life to learn what not to play." — Dizzy Gillespie
  • "I don't mind being the butt of a joke—if it's a funny joke." — Kenny G.
  • "Those people were mavericks. The only person who wanted them was me. I mean, was Gene Krupa hard to get? Was Bunny Berigan hard to get?" — Benny Goodman
  • "I spent a lot of time playing in miserable places that were not a lot of fun. Somebody once said it is character building and I was like: My character is just fine." — Diana Krall
  • "It's not the mistakes that count, it's what you do after them that counts." — Thelonious Monk
    — contributed by Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Duane Webster Duane Webster: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"To be a real folk-singer, you have to collect the songs straight from the horse's mouth. The way you do this is to go to a small village, find the oldest inhabitant, and ask him to sing you the songs his mother taught him. You'll probably find out that he is deaf, and if he isn't deaf he can't sing, and if he can sing he doesn't want to and, by the time you've persuaded him and he does sing, you won't understand a word of what he's singing about. This is how folk songs have been passed down from generation to generation!" — unknown, contributed by Steven Langer

"Those in the cheaper seats clap. The rest of you rattle your jewelry." — John Lennon

"I like to listen to a song that I can disappear into but that is related to the things that I love or that I worry about and that might help me feel like I'm in company. You escape also because the harshness of physical is sometimes confusing. It's like, 'Wait a second. At night I go to bed and I dream, and then I wake up. What's the difference between these tow tings? Why can't I just have one of these two existences? Why can't one share more with the other?' I feel like music is halfway between waking and dreaming." — Bonnie 'Prince' Billy quoted by Matt Fink in "Bonnie 'Prince' Billy / Now He Sees a Darkness (Again)," American Songwriter March / April 2009

“The Lord is my drummer, I shall not rush, He maketh me to layout in tasteful places, He leadeth me beside cool meter changes, He restoreth my "one." Yeah, man, though I read through the trickiest of charts, I will fear no train wrecks, for you are with it. Your ride and your snare they comfort me, You setteth up a solo for me In the presence of mine guitarists, You anointeth my lines with drive, My groove overfloweth. Surely good feel and swing will follow me through all the tunes of each set, and I will dwell in the pocket the whole gig long – Amen.” — unknown
— contributed by Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Duane Webster Duane Webster: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"We're the Village People of folk music." — Bob Laughlin of Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Bob's Basement Band Bobs Basement Band: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets at the Hot Pickles reunion concert at Swallow Hill, February 22, 2009

Frazz: "Maybe life isn't as linear as it seems ... think music."
Girl: "Music? ohhh. Right! A song isn't its final note. It's all its notes at once! And whatever notes you choose to remember!" — Jef Mallett, "Frazz," Denver Post, February 8, 2009

"Store owners know that playing music with a tempo faster than the human heartbeat causes shoppers to shop quickly—and therefore buy less. The slower the beat, the more time shoppers will take, and the greater the chances are that they'll buy something.
Music can also direct us to certain products. For example, it can determine what kind of wine we pick up from the shelves. In one experiment ... researchers played either accordion-heavy French music or a German brass band over the speakers of the wine section inside a large supermarket. On French music days, 77% of consumers bought French wine, whereas on German music days, the vast majority of consumers picked up a German selection.
Intriguingly, only one out of the 44 customers who agreed to answer a few questions at the checkout counter mentioned the music as among the reasons they bought the wine they did." — Martin Lindstrom, "How Subliminal Advertising Works," Parade, January 4, 2009

"You should get a new cello made out of dogwood. They age faster: 7 times faster." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets to Hannah Alkire, cello player for Acoustic Eidelon

"Bring me my decompression chamber. I've got the bends." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets, after listening to Brandy Herbert Brandy Herbert: Bands, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians play her Telecaster with a B-bender

"the way I feel about music is that there is no right and wrong. Only true and false." — Fiona Apple, solution to Celebrity Cipher, The Rocky Mountain News, December 11, 2008

"Our intrepid sound department today takes credit for several innovations and techniques, such as a separate overhead vocal PA and the 'snake cable' that joins stage equipment to a mixing console in the middle of the audience. This system was in part devised because Peter Green had taken to throwing things at Dinky Dawson when he didn't like the sound Dinky was getting, mixing from the wings." — Mick Fleetwood, "Fleetwood / My Life and Adventures in Fleetwood Mac"

"By the early summer of 1979 we had finished recording [Tusk], although 'finish' is a relative term. Like the proverbial poem that's never complete, but only abandoned in despair, the recording process was finally ended. We had twenty good songs, and we didn't feel there was any more we could do with them." — Mick Fleetwood, "Fleetwood / My Life and Adventures in Fleetwood Mac"

"We understood the company's point of view. They wanted us to continue our usual groove and make a lot of money for everyone. That was their measure of success.But Fleetwood Mac's measure was the art. It would be naive to say we were oblivious to the money, but the music came first. Then maybe you make some money with it." — Mick Fleetwood, "Fleetwood / My Life and Adventures in Fleetwood Mac"

"I'd rather play by ear than be paper trained." Gail deVore

"Sing softly and carry a big pick." — Ben Cohen

"I just learned my lyrics and tried not to bump into the trumpet player, that was my philosophy." — Jo Stafford, answer to "Celebrity Cipher," The Rocky Mountain News, Sept. 4, 2008

"From a distance, things appear to be what they are not. Our planet looks to be a calm, blue jewel floating in space, but on the surface, there are wars, riots, and rock concerts." — Jimmy Buffett, "A Salty Piece of Land"

"...there are no words to the song of the ocean, but the message is and always has been simple: not to forget where we came from. The melody is locked in the water that composes much of what we are. Most humans tend to ignore the song, but not all. You are one of the lucky ones who hold the melody in your heart. But be warned: it is a wandering song carried by the winds and the currents." — Jimmy Buffett, "A Salty Piece of Land"

"Blues and country are the same thing, just the moods are different. It all comes from life experiences." — Huey P. Meaux, quoted by Kinky Friedman in "Kinky Friedman's Guide to Texas Etiquette"

"Johnny Ace was the first black guy I know of, way before Ray Charles, who could sing country-tainted songs—blues and country together. He cried a song, and it was a feeling you couldn't forget. He had teardrops in his voice." — Huey P. Meaux, quoted by Kinky Friedman in "Kinky Friedman's Guide to Texas Etiquette"

"Old blues cats never sang the same song the same way twice." — Huey P. Meaux, quoted by Kinky Friedman in "Kinky Friedman's Guide to Texas Etiquette"

"Hank Williams's [sic] death, on January 1, 1953, struck a muted, lingering chord across the South. Williams was only twenty-nine when he died: younger than Jesus and Mozart. he wasn't born in Texas, but his music will always live there. Maybe there's something in the dust and the dreams and the distance of Texas that has helped Williams's music carry across the years." — Kinky Friedman, "Kinky Friedman's Guide to Texas Etiquette"

"In spite of the lack of regularly playing together, we actually didn't sound bad at all at our band rehearsal earlier today, so you all might very well enjoy our music. ...
"P.S. If you wish to be removed from my email list, don't hesitate to let me know (well, a little hesitation would be OK), and I'll take the necessary steps." — Peter Schwimmer Peter Schwimmer: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"Sing in your car like no one is watching!" — anonymous

"My intentions were to build a real album, fearing that the album might disappear as a form. Because albums don't make sense in a dowloading economy, I wanted to have a go for waht I was thinking might be the last time." — David Berman, quoted by Evan Rytlewski in "Portraits / Carry on Silver Jews," American Songwriter, July / August 2008

"Not many people make records anymore. A lot of people in this town make singles...and they hope they end up with a record. I prefer to make records and hope I end up with singles. Records are about the spacing and the sequencing." — Eric Church, quoted by Edd Hurt in "Eric Church / The Adventures of the Carolina Kid," American Songwriter, May / June 2008

"A world-class jazz ensemble swings hard for a rapt crowd of toe-tapping executives. Before long, these Armani-clad CEOs join in on the grove—a rhythm section here, some four-part harmony there—and pretty soon you have a corporate jam session even Count Basie would be proud of.
"This unorthodox marriage of business and art is the brainchild of Michael Gold, founder of the Minneapolis-based Jazz Impact Institue. ...he's got some serious advice for senior management in search of effective organizational models: look to jazz. 'We've got five people wailing away, at the height of individual artistic autonomy. At the same time, we are fused together into a high-performance team that would seem to be functioning with one single voice.' Not a bad metaphor for a high-performance workplace." — Linda Dunlop, "jammin' in the Boardroom," Acura magazine, Summer 2008

"If we present a compelling musical experience combined with appropriate motivational messages, then you've got a tool that will sink that learning far deeper than just a talking head." — Michael Gold, quoted by Linda Dunlop in "jammin' in the Boardroom," Acura magazine, Summer 2008

"This is in G minus, for those of you with perfect pitch." — Duncan Tuck, May 3, 2008, at Sheabeen Irish Pub Sheabeen Irish Pub

"This is not a playback studio. This is a recording studio." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"I loved all those notes. They're just in the wrong place." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"They won't hold it a Guiness." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Ernie Martinez Ernie Martinez: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"One day two of my schoolmates invited me to my first psychedelic happening. ... Nothing had prepared me for this, and especially not for Jimi Hendrix, three feet away, eyeball to eyeboall. 'He's faking it,' I thought. 'He can't play.' But then he sang—'Foxy Lady' and 'Purple Haze'—pausing to croon that soon-to-be-world-famous line, 'Excuse me while I kiss the sky,' and then he did. In that moment Jimi challenged everything about me. I was a straight kid who was going to go to college and become middle-class. I looked at this guy who was so werid and odd, and it made me think, 'Who am I? What am I not doing that I could be doing?' He seemed to be whispering to me, 'Young brother, check it out. Check it all out.'" — William P. Lee, "1968 Revelation / Voice of the Reader," AARP Magazine, May/June 2008

"It was just this roller coaster of pain that year, all sorrow and mayhem. For me, the hell was personal, as well—my dad died, I lost custody of my son. I was a young woman learning to work, learning to continue, learning to finish, no matter what. That lesson has stuck with me. Tragedy, comedy, whatever goes on, you have to keep moving, keep making art, because for me, it was all about the music. The world changed because of the music. People began to listen to words, they wanted to hear a story, because ultimately it's the personal that matters; it's how we fight our daily wars. That's what connects us." — Judy Collins, "1968 Inspiration," AARP Magazine, May/June 2008

"What he was playing, neither Helen or Stuart knew, but Teddy always remembered. He put his mind in order with a short resume of the history of music, beginning with some chords from The Messiah and ending with Debussy's La Plus Que Lent, which had an evocative quality for him, because he first heard it the day his brother died. Then, pausing for an instant, he began to play more thoughtfully, and the lovers on the sofa could feel that they were alone—that he had left them and had no more traffic with them—and Helen's discomfort lessened. But the flight, the elusiveness of the music, piqued her, gave her a feeling of annoyance. If Teddy had played the current sentimental song ..., and had played it with feeling, she would have understood and been moved, but he was plunging her suddenly into a world of mature emotions, whither her nature neither could nor wished to follow." — F. Scott Fitzgerald, "What A Handsome Pair!" Saturday Evening Post, August, 1932

"It doesn't have 88 keys." — B. J. Suter BJ Suter: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets , about an electric piano
"Neither does Florida." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Ernie Martinez Ernie Martinez: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians
"It's the keys of death." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"Rap is to music as Etch-a-Sketch is to art." — Bill Donaldson

"Trent Reznor, the singer-songwriter behind Nine Inch Nails, had been recording Year Zero, a grimly futuristic suite evoking an America beset by terrorism, ravaged by climate change, and ruled by a Christian military dictatorship. 'But I had a problem,' he recalls: ...how to provide context for the songs. In the 60's, concept albums came with extensive liner notes and lots of artwork. MP3s don't have that. 'So I started thinking about how to make the world's most elaborate album cover,' he says, 'using the media of today.'
"Years earlier, Reznor had heard about a complex game played out over many months, both online and in the real world, in which millions of people across the planet had collectively solved a cascading series of puzzles, riddles, and treasure hunts that ultimately tied into the Steven Spielberg movie AI: Artificial Intelligence." — Frank Rose, "This Buzz for You," Wired magazine, Jan 2008

"Any time I ever felt like I needed something that didn't exist, I would find a way to make it. That's how I invented multitrack recording—I had this sound in my head, all these harmony parts for guitars and vocals—but no way to do them exactly the way I wanted. So I invented a way to do it." — Les Paul, quoted by Dan Daley in "Life Etc. / Pickup Artist," AARP magazine, March&April 2008

"You know they turned me down the first time I showed [Gibson] my guitar prototype in 1941. Then, ten years later, they came back. Mr. [M.H.] Berlin, the president of the company, said to someone, 'Get me the guy with the broomstick with the pickups!' You might invent the most complicated thing in the world, but convincing everyone else that you're right is the hard part." — Les Paul, quoted by Dan Daley in "Life Etc. / Pickup Artist," AARP magazine, March&April 2008

"Work is a privilege, the more so the older you get. It's a privilege to be able to do what you love to do and be good at it. My hobby is my work, and my work is my hobby. That's the secret. There is no distinction." — Les Paul, quoted by Dan Daley in "Life Etc. / Pickup Artist," AARP magazine, March&April 2008

"Just as his run of hit records was beginning to crest, a devastating car wreck in 1948 laid up the guitarist for two years and irreparably damaged his right arm. Instead of accepting what should have been a career-ending injury, [Les] Paul instructed the surgeon to fuse his elbow in a permanent string-picking position. Huge hits such as 'How High the Moon' and 'Vaya Con Dios' followed. He reacted the same way when arthritis began to deform his left hand: he devises a new way to form chords." — Dan Daley, "Life Etc. / Pickup Artist," AARP magazine, March&April 2008

"What is called the music business today ...is not the business of producing music. At some point it became the business of selling CDs in plastic cases..." — David Byrne, "The Fall and Rise of Music," Wired, Jan 2008

"We'll always want to use music as part of our social fabric: to congregate at concerts and in bars, even if the sound sucks; to pass music from hand to hand (or via the Internet) as a form of social currency; to build temples where only 'our kind of people' can hear music (opera houses and symphony halls); to want to know more about our favorite bards—their love lives, their clothes, their political beliefs. This betrasy an eternal urge to have a larger context beyond a piec of plastic. One might way this urge is part of our genetic makeup. " — David Byrne, "The Fall and Rise of Music," Wired, Jan 2008

"If you sing or play a musical instrument, convey your love through music: Write a song just for them, or at least learn one or two of their favorite tunes. Heck, try singing to them even if you can't sing. A moment's embarrassment will give them a lifetime memory. — Jeanie Bonansing, "living / Say 'I Love You'," Better Homes and Gardens, February 2008

"Emanuel Ax, the great concert pianist, recalls the nervousness when his ensemble, which included cellist Yo-Yo Ma and violinist Jaime Laredo, proposed a new variation on an old piece to their partner, the esteemed violinist Isaac Stern. Stern was more than 20 years older than they were and had likely played the composition hundreds of times before. The wouldn't be surprised if he resisted the change. So what did Stern, the nearly 80, think of this new approach? He hesitated briefly, Ax recalls, then said: 'Let's try it.'" — "Let's Try Listening," AARP Bulletin, January-February 2008

"He has harp'n'sings disease." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Ernie Martinez Ernie Martinez: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians about Jon Chandler Jon Chandler: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets.

"Music can save people. But it can't in the commercial way it's being used. It's just too much. It's pollution." — Bob Dylan, answer to Celebrity Cipher, Colorado Springs Gazette, Dec. 13, 2007

"A painting was a dull sword with which to fight a way, and a painter himself could be a hypocrite. But music was a numbing, soothing poison, which—dripped into the general water supply—contaminated everyone." — Andromeda Romano-Lax, "The Spanish Bow"

"The cellist's left hand was a technician—to find a quarter note of B on the A string, it headed to the first fingering, in the first position. The right hand, on the other hand, was an artist, whose palette included the weight of the bow, the speed of the bow, the proximity of the bow to the bridge, all of which colored and shaded that note an infinite number of ways. From the simplest materials, so much was possible...or felt possible, anyway, which was the first step toward innovation, as well as the first step toward disillusionment and rebellion." — Andromeda Romano-Lax, "The Spanish Bow"

"Your article on Tony Bennett inspired me so much that I am searching for ways to fund my new musicial passion—playing the clarinet. While it's admirable that Tony is passing on his knowledge to young artists such as Christina Aguilera, it's important to remember that learning the arts does not just belong to young people. I'm testament to that!" — Lanae Isaacson, "The Mail / American Idol," AARP November&December 2007

"Spirit ... you feel it best when you're not doing much—when you're in nature, when you're very quiet or, paradoxically, listening to music.
"I know you can feel it and hear it in the music you love, in the bass line, in the harmonies, in the silence between notes: on Chopin and Eminem, Emmylou Harris, Neil Young, Bach, whomever. You can close your eyes and feel the divine spark concentrated in you, like a little Dr. Seuss firefly." — Anne Lamott, Plan B Further Thoughts on Faith

"I opened the door for a lot of people, and they just ran through and left me holding the knob." — Bo Diddley, answer to Celebrity Cipher, Colorado Springs Gazette, Nov. 29, 2007

"Let a happy song find a path though your sad heart." — David Baird, A Thousand Paths to Happiness

"Walk on a rainbow trail; walk on a trail of song, and all about you will be beauty. There is a way out of every dark mist, over a rainbow trail." — Navajo song, quoted by David Baird, A Thousand Paths to Happiness

"Happiness is rather like jazz. If you have to ask what it is, you'll probably never know." — David Baird, A Thousand Paths to Happiness

"...the pianist was gone, and a bunch of people were crying, singing very loudly with their eyes closed, and the singing of that cry of a song was a wonderful form of communion. How come you can hear a chord, and then another chord, and then your heart breaks open?" — Anne Lamott, "Traveling Mercies"

"I can't imagine anything but music that could have brought about this alchemy. Maybe it's because music is about as physical as it gets: your essential rhythm is your heartbeat; your essential sound, the breath. We're walking temples of noise, and when you add tender hearts to this mix, it somehow lets us meet in places we couldn't get to any other way." — Anne Lamott, "Traveling Mercies"

"The piano began again—what was this music? Unplaced, familiar, the limpid melody had lain a long while dormant in his heart. Now it spoke to him of another time, another place—it was the music Elizabeth used to play. The delicate air summoned a wilderness of memory. Ferris was lost in the riot of past longings, conflicts, ambivalent desires. Strange that the music, catalyst for this tumultuous anarchy, was so serene and clear. The singing melody was broken off by the appearance of the maid. ...
"Even after Ferris was seated at the table between his host and hostess, the unfinished music still overcast his mood. He was a little drunk.
"'L'improvisation de la vie humaine,' he said. 'There's nothing that makes you so aware of the improvisation of human existance as a song unfinished. Or an old address book.'" — Carson McCullers, "The Sojourner" in "The Ballad of The Sad Cafe and Other Stories"

"In memory everything seems to happen to music." — Tennessee Williams, answer to Celebrity Cipher, Colorado Springs Gazette, Oct. 9, 2007

"Some of Jock [Bartley, guitarist for Firefall and Zephyr (after Tommy Bolin)]'s main messages were that artists need to get out there and play live - have fun, be prepared and be sharp, so that if a 'big break' comes, they're ready. He said he spent many years practicing guitar and, when his opportunity finally came, he was ready." — Announcements from Colorado Music Association

"Music is the soundtrack of your life." — Dick Clark, answer to Celebrity Cipher, Colorado Springs Gazette, Sept. 27, 2007

"No matter what culture we're from, everyone loves music." — Billy Joel, answer to Celebrity Cipher, Colorado Springs Gazette, Sept. 27, 2007

"Count Basie said this about it: They don't pay me for playing. That's always how I felt too. They don't have to pay us for the two hours we get to play; what they're paying us for is the twenty-two other hours in the day, the Holiday Inns and buses and the airports and waiting around and the lost luggage and bad food. It's really not easy on the road." — Craig Doerge, "Long Time Gone"

"The Beatles were still on the bubble-gum end of the dial. They weren't into their 'Rubber Soul-Sgt. Pepper' stuff. They were not complicated. They were just dumb. The were dumb enough that all the little kids liked it and because the little kids like it, we all got to hear it." — Bob Neuwirth, "Long Time Gone"

"We knew it was a hit when we were back in Los Angeles, riding down Sunset Boulevard in that funky old station wagon, and KRLA played our 'Mr. Tambourine Man.' We freaked! There is no feeling I'll ever have like that time, hearing our tune on the car radio, without warning, for the very first time, ever. And then they played it again! It was such a hot hit that they played it two or three times in a row. By that time we were so excited we had to pull over. Couldn't drive anymore! I mean, we knew at that moment that our lives had changed. Literally. We were going to be able to make a living at playhing music." — David Crosby, "Long Time Gone"

"Some young women, in that time before conciousness-raising, became camp followers to an army of musicians. The affectionate diminutive 'groupie' was probably preferable to the terminology of the big band era of the forties, when women who chased musicians were called 'band rats.'" — Carl Gottlieb, "Long Time Gone"

"Life in the hills and canyons was a free-form come-as-you-are party. Unless a band was recording or touring, there was lots of free time to enjoy a lifestyle formerly only available to dilettantes with independent incomes and inherited wealth. In the absence of hereditary titles and divine right monarchy, America always re-creates an aristocracy, usually drawing on sports, politics, the arts, and show business. The new princes and princesses of rock 'n' roll lost no time exploring a way of life that had led Old World nobility to ruin and revolution." — Carl Gottlieb, "Long Time Gone"

"... the big-business union-label systems at the major studios were not only annoying, they interfered with the creative process. The old guys didn't know it yest, but the studio was no longer a passive space in which to record sounds; it was becoming a tool, part of the method, another color on the palette. The new recording artists weren't just reproducing live sounds, they were using new tools to make new sounds, By 1968, thanks to advances in electronic amplification, a trio like Cream (Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce) could produce a greater volume of sheer sound than any other accumulation of instruments, brass band or symphonic, in history." — Carl Gottlieb, "Long Time Gone"

"Studios are a time machine. They allow you to take a moment, stop that moment, replay it, divide it up, analyze it, dissect it, restructure it, play it again, analy it, change it, restructure it, and then play it once more. You can do the the most amazing work in the studio." — David Crosby, "Long Time Gone"

"Through the ["King" Cole] trio, Nat Cole was naturally billed as 'King' Cole. Later in his career, not working with the trio, publicists billed him as Nat 'King' Cole to make sure his fans knew it was the same guy. Eventually, the quotes were dropped....
"As a side note, other jazz luminaries of the period carried equally ostentation nicknames, notable Count Basie (first name William) and Duke Ellington (first name Edward). Would the history of music have been the same had they been Bill Basie and Ed Ellington? It certainly wouldn't have seemed the same.
"By the way, Nat's real middle name was Adams." — Bangs Tapscott, Intermountain Acoustic Musician, September 2007

"Music is the shorthand of emotion." — Leo Tolstoy, answer to Celebrity Cipher, The [Colorado Springs] Gazette, Jul 19, 2007

"[The banjo] has so many obstructors. It has fewer strings than a guitar, and it's tuned to a chord, so there's limited functionality there. It has intonation problems. It tends to go out of tune. It's fussy and finicky, and that's why I like it. It's so idiosyncratic that it kind of thwarts any standardized, classical notions you may have about an instrument. It's not an instrument you have to master; it's a folk instrument that can accompany any voice. It's the kind of instrument that's for the everyday common man. that's kind of why I like it." — Sufjan Stevens, quoted by Evan Rytlewski, "Sufjan Stevens Narratives, Concepts, and Puzzle Pieces", American Songwriter, September / October, 2006

"Country music is three chords and the truth." — Harlan Howard, answer to Celebrity Cipher, The [Colorado Springs] Gazette, Jul 19, 2007

"Unfortuately, [Bela] Fleck continues to have the charisma of an accountant. This is why you don't let a banjo player front your band." — Warren Epstein, "Diverse bluegrass entranced Telluride" The [Colorado Springs] Gazette, Jun 29, 2007

"Painting ... was okay as long as the painter didn't try to make you guess whether it was a picture of the Hill Country or kitchen linoleum.
"...the only music I appreciated was cowboy, and I didn't recall that old Billy Joe Mozart or Connie Fay Beethoven had written much of it.
"Poetry ... was just a case of old Robert Browning asking old Elizabeth Barrett if she wanted to [have sex]—but making it rhyme.
"...My favorite American authors ... were a few guys who could write about sports and gangsters and make it funny. And in terms of the literary classics, ... I'd probably go with the books that were the longest and the dullest because they would be thick and help fill up the shelves.
"And that was all I knew ... about your liveley arts." — Dan Jenkins, Dead Solid Perfect

"Frost and his wife, Marquita, weathered the storm wedged between the furnace and the refrigerator in their basement. When neighbors helped free the couple from the rubble of their house at 313 South Bay St., they saw clouds of dust and what remained of their living room, minus the north wall.
"'I had a big bass violin that I keep near the door,' Frost said. 'It was standing up like nothing had happened.'" — Found in a news story about the tornado survivors in Kansas, contributed by Gail de Vore

"The mother ... suddenly and without warning attacked the unsuspecting piano and took off from there, one chubby hand banging out the rhythm while the other banged out something else. The small upright seemed to be jumping up and down, fighting for its life, as she pumped away at the foot pedals." — Fanny Flagg, "Standing in the Rainbow"

"There was a sad song on the radio, and the [cab] driver, who was trying to sing along with it, was too happy to stick with the beat." — Etgar Keret, The Nimrod Flip Out

"Two guys were sitting together in a bar. One of them is majoring in something or other in college, the other abuses his guitar once a day and thinks he's a musician." — Etgar Keret, The Nimrod Flip Out

"Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps the singing bird will come." —Chinese proverb, from Woman's Day Magazine, October 1998

"Use the talents you possess; for the woods would be very silent if no birds sang except the best." — unknown

"The poet Muriel Rukeyser said the universe is composed of stories, not of atoms. The physicist Werner Heisenberg declared that the universe is made of music, not of matter." — Rob Brezsny, PRONOIA Is the Antidote for Paranoia: How the Whole World Is Conspiring to Shower You with Blessings

"And we believe that if you habitually expose yourself to toxic stories and music, you could wind up living in the wrong universe, where it's impossible to become the gorgeous genius you were born to be. That's why we implore you to nourish yourself with delicious, nutritious tales and tunes that inspire you to exercise your willpower for your highest good." — Rob Brezsny, PRONOIA Is the Antidote for Paranoia: How the Whole World Is Conspiring to Shower You with Blessings

"Something about the phrase classical accordion just doesn't fit. Like saying kazoo virtuoso or castanet prodigy, it just rings wrong." — Richard Chapman, "The Accordion gets a second wind," University of Denver Magazine, Winter 2006

"An instrument's scratches carry the memory of where it's been. Who's played it. The songs it has sung. I look at a beat-up old instrument, see its flaws, and I wonder. And although I hope people will be careful when they borrow one of my instruments, the more beat up it already is, the less I worry. Another player, another song, another mark—it's all part of the story." — Tom Smart, "The Two and Four", Intermountain Acoustic Musician, December 2006

"It was just that music thing that bothered me. Carnegie Hall and Nashville. They just don't mix." — Lt. Columbo

"I worry that the person who thought up Muzak may be thinking up something else." — Lily Tomlin, contributed by Stuart Tarbuck

"I don't have an ego. None. Mother taught me that 72 years ago. NO EGO. She used to say, 'Don't let your latitude get in the way of your attitude.'" — Charlie Burrell, quoted by Tamara Chapman, "Music Man", University of Denver Magazine, Fall 2006

"That [Charlie] Burrell could straddle the two art forms [symphonic music and jazz] so successfully made him an anomoly for most of his career.... Today, jazz and classical musicians cross genres all the time [Professor Arthur] Jones explains, 'but in Charlie's generation, it was extremely uncommon. Most jazz musicians did not even know how to read music. They played by ear.'
"Not only that, Burrell adds, but few blacks were afforded access to orchestral concerts, and most considered the realm of Mozart and Wagner both alien and unfriendly. His own aunt, he remembers, could barely fathom his interest in classical music and would ask him how he liked working with the 'Denver Sympathy Band.'" — Tamara Chapman, "Music Man", University of Denver Magazine, Fall 2006

"Radio conglomerates that let corporate headquarters decide what should be played in local markets always will be chasing the Next Big Thing, flipping its stations every couple of years hoping to get at a shrinking listener market that would rather listen to music on their iPods." — Cindy Rodruguez, "Misplaced pride let to reggaeton's Mega-flop", The Denver Post, Sept. 26, 2006

"There are enough Martin guitars to shake a pick at." — heard at the Walnut Valley Bluegrass Festival, Sept. 2006

"String Theory. Guitar makers think they know why huge demand exists for their high-end products: Boomers either spring for the new or vintage instruments they've always wanted to play, or start collections that, if trends continue, will be worth more than their Woodstock tickets when they finally retire." — AARP Bulletin, Sept 2006

"A viola is a manly violin." — anon, heard at the Swallow Hootenanny

"Bring your iPod to the hospital: patients who listen to tunes after surgery have less pain (and need fewer painkillers) than those who don't, notes a Tufts University report. Music's effect was equal to a 325-mg dose of the painkiller acetaminophen." — Melissa Gotthardt, AARP, Sep&Oct, 2006

On tuning: "Pluck the one you twist." — Bob Cooke

"I pick therefore I grin" — seen on a T-shirt at the MidWinter Bluegrass Festival, Feb. 2007

"Bob Dylan once went electric. [Bruce] Springsteen is going eclectic." — Larry McShane in "Springsteen takes a folksy turn", The Denver Post, April 25, 2006

"The songs have lasted 100 years, or hundreds of years, for a reason.... They were really, really well-written pieces of music.... They have worlds in them. You just kind of go in — it's a playground. You go in, and you get to play around." — Bruce Springsteen on performing folk and old blues songs, quoted by Larry McShane in "Springsteen takes a folksy turn", The Denver Post, April 25, 2006

"Joe recalled a conversation he once had with a music major: 'This university has a very good conservatory. Our teachers can put on damned good opera. But do you know how the board of regents judges the department? How good the marching band is. If a hundred and fifty young men and women in military uniform swing onto the football field between halves, and keep step, then the music department gets a generous budget next year . . . and to hell with Beethoven. The regents are right. Do you know why? Because every little town in California demands that its high school have a marching band . . . in military uniform . . . keeping step . . . drilling to John Philip Sousa. The citizens want this because they love the military . . . they love parades. And if this university can't provide music graduates to build marching bands—by God, the small towns will look to some other university . . . and we'll be in trouble. The regents aren't dumb. They know what's important.'" — James A. Michener, The Drifters

"The bass is what you hear through your feet." — Roger Wise

"...live your life as if it were a song you love." — Freewill Astrology, Aries, Feb. 16, 2006

"When people say, 'I don't understand your music,' I say, 'Don't try to understand it, just try to feel it.'" — Dizzy Gillespie, quoted by Studs Terkel in "And They All Sang," from Freewill Astrology, Aries, Feb. 16, 2006

"'If you think this is going to go to our head, it's too late.' Bono, lead singer for U2, which won five Grammy awards Wednesday, including album of the year" — "Voices in the News", The Denver Post, Feb. 12, 2006

"...the [Rolling] Stones are the doyens of rock, always at the top, surviving ructions without splitting up and, 40 years on, their only compromise to their audience was to mute some double entendres. Old rockers never die, they only lose their expletives." — "Stones still rolling after 40 years" from The Guardian (United Kingdom), Feb. 8, as reprinted in The Denver Post, Feb. 12, 2006

"Perry Como or punk rock? If you want to be good to your ear, stick to slow music, says Peter Sleight, M. D., of John Radcliffe Hospital at the University of Oxford, England. Sleight monitored subjects as they listened to music and found that slow-tempo tunes induced heart-healthy drop-offs in breathing rate and blood pressure. Taking a two-minute break between songs can enhance the effect — in the study, doing so induced a more marked relaxation state afterward." — M.G, "Research", AARP the Magazine, March/April, 2006

"We are musical instruments: some person might be a violin; the other one is a clarinet; another is a saxophone. You can change your words, your hair, your makeup, but you can't change that energetic essence that you are. And film knows that intimately, and it does not lie." — Goldie Hawn, "Goldie Luxe" by Nancy Griffin, AARP the Magazine, March/April, 2006

"Leonard Steinhorn ... passionately argues that the children of Woodstock changed the world for the better — and deserve more acclaim than their World War II parents do." — "Hot Reads", AARP the Magazine, March/April, 2006

"Alison Krauss, 34, has Aretha [Franklin] beat by one [Grammy]. The Illinois native captured her first Grammy in 1990 and her 17th in 2003. Her 27 nominations included the folk, bluegrass, country and gospel categories, plus soundtracks and various collaborations. — Walter Scott, "PersonalityParade", Parade, Feb. 5, 2006

"[I heard] John Denver on my iPod just now. I'm thankful it was only that, my own private headphone concert,, not a blaring faux pas over PC speakers. It was a live recording of 'Country Roads' from who knows where. I don't know how the track got on my computer, but iTunes thinks it's 'Ice Ice Baby.' Either way I knew what it was....My name is Mike and I like John Denver. There. It really does feel good to get something like that out. And I won't apologize or feel ashamed. My music collection kicks ass. ...I know my shit. Nevertheless, there is a John Denver track on my iPod. My only regret is that it's the only one." — Michael E. Henderson, "John Denver anonymous", Mountain Gazette #120

"...[H]e was the lead guitarist in a rock group called the Meteors, not too prophetic in that it never did achieve any measure of fame, its streak across the stratosphere being confined to the single gig it played in the local high school gymnasium. The rest of the time, the group spent rehearsing in their parents' garages. This was when [he] was eighteen years old and there was a rock group rehearsing in every garage in America." — Ed McBain, Mischief

"...[He] shared this same slight loss of hearing with anyone who back then had learned three guitar chords and talked their parents into buying them twenty-thousand dollars' worth of amplifiers and speakers for which they needed only one other cord (his father was fond of saying) to plug into an electric outlet, har, har, har, Dad." — Ed McBain, Mischief

'I think that learning through the arts is really the only way that young children learn because the arts are play and expressive and creative, and we don't have much room in our lives for that anymore,' says [Katherine] Dines, noting that research shows that melodies and rhythmic phrases may be stored forever in the limbic region of our brains." — Janna Widdifield, "Hunk-ta Bunk-ta, Boo", University of Denver Magazine, Winter 2005

"Dad's fiddle, when he played it, was more like a big blast...He played a lot of open strings—it was real resonant. Some of it was almost a bagpipey sound. It was a big sound, I thought. They played that way, and they played by their selves—they didn't need anyone to play with them because they had all the rhythm right there in their bow." — Art Stamper, "An Interview with Art Stamper" by Paul Brown, Old-Time Herald, Winter 2000/'01

"I learned a lot of that old stuff that Dad played. After that, I thought Dad was a little too old-timey for me. I decided to branch off and started to play other stuff. I played all kind of fiddle. Now, as I'm getting older, those tunes just ring in my ears. I've come back to playing some of Dad's old tunes and it's getting me a lot of work, really it is." — Art Stamper, "An Interview with Art Stamper" by Paul Brown, Old-Time Herald, Winter 2000/'01

"Some ancestor had been a fiddler, I'm told, but the other members of the wagon train got so sick of it, they 'accidentally' placed his instrument under the wheels." — Kerry Blech, "In the Field — An Interview with Mark Wilson", Old-Time Herald, Winter 2000/'01

"...Eddie [Edward L. Crain] went off to New York where he stayed in the YMCA and played at places like The Little Red Schoolhouse in the Village dressed up in full ranch regalia. Somehow he even got booked on a tour with Jean Harlowe and Bing Crosby. He liked Harlowe. He said he tried to modernize his fare but Harlow told him to stick to the cowboy stuff. All of this, of course, gave me a rather different picture of the ways of folk song than found in those somewhat romanticized books I was reading." — Kerry Blech, "In the Field — An Interview with Mark Wilson", Old-Time Herald, Winter 2000/'01

"One of the pitfalls you should try to avoid ... is the illusion that you, as producer, are somehow more responsible for the music rather than the artists, for then you become tempted to shape the music according to some predetermined scheme of your own..." — Mark Wilson, "In the Field — An Interview with Mark Wilson" by Kerry Blech, Old-Time Herald, Winter 2000/'01

"...I don't even sing in a choir. I hardly sing by myself although I've been told I have a lovely voice. I actually sing in five keys. Unfortunately it's while I'm singing the same song — helpful if you are calling your cat....Well, it's time for my singing lesson if I can find my teacher. She is hard of hearing and almost seems to avoid me. Can't figure that..." — George Douthit III, "Where's Florence, Colorado?", Woodmoor Monthly, November, 2005

"'We've gone from a country of music makers to music consumers.' [John Feierabend, director of the music education division at the Hartt School, a renowned music and performing arts program at the University of Hartford] says. He argues that children must interact with music to take full measure of their musical skills. Singing silly rhymes like patty-cake ... helps cultivate a love of music and actual musical ability." — News&Views, USA Weekend, Oct. 14-16, 2005

"I think everybody has a right to happiness and freedom and security and health care and education and guitar lessons." — Bonnie Raitt, in A lot on her mind by Steven Chean, USA Weekend, Oct 7-9, 2005

"There's a tremendous amount of ageism in the entertainment industry. Americans are generally uncomfortable looking at older people. There's a glorification of youth. It's lame. All my friends and peers are doing their best work now. Look at the body of work of someone like Sting, and the Stones are still writing great music." — Bonnie Raitt, in A lot on her mind by Steven Chean, USA Weekend, Oct 7-9, 2005

"Musicians learn technique — how to play their instruments. Everybody has to learn technique, but it's hard to find somebody who can teach you how to feel music, how to enjoy playing, how to understand that music is a way of living." — jazz bassist Gonzalo Teppa, winner of Down Beat magazine student music awards in 2004 and 2005 for outstanding solos, as quote by Mike Liguori in "Swinging the Down Beat", Coloradoan, Sept. 2005

"In just five short years, from 1948 to his death in the back seat of a car on Jan. 1, 1953, Hank Williams recorded 66 songs, many of which can still be heard on radio stations almost anywhere in the world. A Nashville songwriter named Harlan Howard summed them up in a nutshell: 'Three chords and the truth.'" —Allen Barra, Music titan's life told right, The Denver Post, Sept. 18, 2005

"'All I did was write and sing... dissolve myself into situations where I was invisible' Dylan said of his teenage years, when he hid away in his family's attached garage with rock bands called The Shadow Blasters and The Golden Chords." — Nadine Epstein and Rebecca Frankel, "Bob Dylan The Unauthorized Spiritual Biography", Moment, August 2005

"[Walter] Sorrentino says he has focused on the blues because the genre is 'a lot more expressive than rock and roll. It just sends out a more pertinent message than rock does nowadays.'" — "Blues brother", University of Denver Magazine, Sept/Oct 2005

"One sells a guitar to buy a better guitar, or because one has completely run out of financial options. One does not sell a guitar to buy jewelry." — Jan Ian, "The Care and Feeding of Your Acoustic Guitar", Performing Songwriter, July/August 2002

"Most people who own guitars are like me. they love their instruments. They know that every guitar has a reason for being, and every guitar has a tale to tell. Every guitar has its own personality." — Jan Ian, "The Care and Feeding of Your Acoustic Guitar", Performing Songwriter, July/August 2002

"I ran into Pink backstage after a performance in L. A. She said the pain she sees in me when I'm playing is like the pain she feels when she's singing. To me that reinforced the idea that I play with the soul of an improvisational singer.
"...The difference between what I'm doing versus what violinists are doing with other bands (Arcade Fire, Yellowcard) is that the violin in my band is the lead vocalist. A singer would lose his voice trying to emulate what I play. I owe that to professors teaching me die-hard classical techniques." — Bobby Yang, violinist who "power-bows improvised covers of the likes of Led Zeppelin, Guns N' Roses and Prince", as quoted by Elana Ashanti Jefferson, The Denver Post, July 15, 2005

"This next song is about death. ...Death — It's what got us into bluegrass. [Bluegrass] has the highest mortality count of any genre." — Austin Lounge Lizards, Swallow Hill, July 15, 2005

"Theirs [the Beatles] is a happy, cocky, belligerently resource-less brand of harmonic primitivism . . . In the Liverpudlian repertoire, the indulgent amateurishness of the musical material, though closely rivaled by the indifference of the performing style, is actually surpassed only by the ineptitude of the studio production method.(Strawberry Fields suggests a chance encounter at a mountain wedding between Claudio Monteverdi and a jug band.)" — Glenn Gould, contributed by Ed Skibbe Ed Slibbe: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"...[John] Cohen's most recognizable picture happened after he met a baby-faced Bob Dylan in New York. Cohen snapped the now-famous photo of Dylan standing on his roof in 1962, his guitar tucked under his arm so his hands were free to hike up a pair of baggy, threadbare pants. The image has become a classic peek at a monumental music figure before his artistic breakthrough.
" 'In those days, (Dylan) was part Charlie Chaplin,' Cohen said of his friend. 'It's interesting because he wasn't really who he would become.' " — Elana Ashanti Jefferson, The Denver Post, July 8, 2005

"...the Chemehuevi Indians ... lived in the hard, harsh heart of the Mojave Desert. A boy came of age only when he memorized the song of his clan, which took years to learn and days to sing. The songs contained a verbal map of the clan's claimed territory, with references to every water hole, seasonal bloom and haunt of the bighorn sheep. Anyone passing through that clan's territory would hire a guide who knew the song and so could find the hidden water.
"I longed to learn such a song.
"But alas, I was the son of an itinerant city manager, and I had myself become a rootless reporter. I had moved and moved from place to place, nearly forgetting my own longing for a song." — Peter Aleshire, editor, Arizona Highways, April 2005

"A little night music can help older adults sleep better and longer.
"In a study of men and women ages 60 to 83, those who listened to soft, soothing music for 45 minutes at bedtime reported that it took them less time to fall asleep, and that their sleep was sounder than before.
"The study [was] by researchers ... who found that soft music eased the pain patients often experience after surgery." — "Discoveries", AARP Bulletin, June 2005

"I've been young, worn the T-shirt and thrown it away. Indeed, when I was a rock journalist in the 60's, I was even kissed by Mick Jagger—the man who is at this very moment set to embark on another exhausting tour, leaping into the air with his creaky joints as he belts out 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' for the millionth time. But I've had enough sex, drugs and rock'n'roll to last me a lifetime, and I'm due for a change." — Virginia Ironside, "Exit Lines: Sorry, Mick, I'll sit this one out", AARP Bulletin, June 2005

Willow: "Don't you have any ambition?"
Oz: "E flat diminished 9th. The E flat — it's doable. But the diminished 9th — It's a man's chord. You could lose a finger." — Buffy the Vampire Slayer

"They ain't much to look at but they usually sound okay." — said of the Holden Wolford band, on stage at Shea Stadium Highlands Ranch, benefit for Mike Lantz

"If the Beatles had a banjo, they'd still be together." — Ron Lynam, Shea Stadium Highlands Ranch, benefit for Mike Lantz

"I was afraid the banjo was in tune there for a second so I'm making sure it didn't happen." — Ron Lynam, Shea Stadium Highlands Ranch, benefit for Mike Lantz

"The difference between bluegrass and folk music is that people like folk music." — Ron Thomason, CBMS Bluegrass Jamboree at Swallow Hill, April 2005

"A rich day—brimming with scenery and history.
"But at the end of it, I think mostly of that meadow, with the ode of the oriole, the symphony of that wind and the dance of the grass." — Peter Aleshire, Arizona Highways, April 2005

"I started singing when I started talking. I always had such a desire to be around music. I absorbed it like a sponge. I'd hear my mother singing Rigaletto around the house, and then I'd hear Al Green's 'Call Me' on the radio. At night I'd listen to the radio under the covers and sing along. The radio was my friend, speaking just to me. Music was such a gift!" — Mariah Carey, Parade Magazine, June 5, 2005

"I've never seen a kid really practice and not get good. If you really practice, you will get so good so fast, you won't believe it." — Paul Green, in Rocking the Classroom, USA Weekend, June 3-5, 2005

"The folk music wars of Denver" — Mark Hutchinson at Acoustic Music Revival

"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is." — Joe DiMaggio

"I want to move to theory. Everything works in theory." — Stuart Tarbuck

"He doesn't rock around the clock, or play that old-time rock'n'roll, and he has never, ever rocked the Casbah.
"But if there's a rock'n'roll heaven, surely they're saving Les Paul a seat.
"The electric guitar that Paul invented fueled a music genre he had nothing to do with.
"...And while he may never have developed a taste for Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Duane Allman or the other rock titans who gained fame playing his guitar, Paul says he has 'a very warm feeling' for the youngsters who turned him into a legend." — Paula Schleis, "Guitarist Les Paul still playing his beloved jazz at 89", The Denver Post, May 15, 2005

"Which brings us to the arts, whose purpose, in common with astrology, is to use frauds in order to make human beings seem more wonderful than they really are. Dancers show us human beings who move much more gracefully than human beings really move. Film and books and plays show us people talking much more entertainingly than people really talk, make paltry human enterprises seem important. Singers and musicians show us human beings making sounds far more lovely than human beings really make. Architects give us temples in which something marvelous is obviously going on. Actually, practically nothing is going on inside. And on and on.
"The arts put man at the center of the universe, whether he belongs there or not." — Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Wampeters Foma & Granfalloons (Opinions)

"You know summer is just around the corner when the robins start singing Jimmy Buffett." — "Grand Avenue", The Denver Post, May 14, 2005

"The bubbling brook would lose its song if you removed the rocks." — unknown

"The barter system...[is] highly under-rated. 'You scratch my banjo, I'll scratch yours.'" — Stuart Tarbuck

"[A jam] is like opening a tin of sardines. We're all of us looking for the key." — modified from a quote by Peter Cook in "Take a Pew" Beyond the Fringe, contributed by Stuart Tarbuck

"I understand the charm of old things, being one myself. And as a rule, I agree that the latest idea is not necessarily the best idea—just look at EST, 8-tracks, or Paris Hilton." — Denis Boyles, AARP Magazine, May&June, 2005

"Computer programmer to bass player... quite a journey!" — source unknown, contributed by Stuart Tarbuck

"What can you do with it? It's like a lot of yaks jumping bout." — Sir Thomas Beecham on Beethoven's 7th Symphony, contributed by Stuart Tarbuck

"Brain dead at work? Throw on your headphones and hit the pavement.
"We know exercise improves mood, but research at Ohio State suggest working out to music boosts the brain as well. The study tested people's emotions and verbal fluency before and after exercise. Verbal ability improved only when music accompanied the exercise. So if you're on a deadline and the mojo's not flowing, take 20 minutes to walk around the block with your MP3 player pumping tunes. Even with the break, you'll finish your project faster, because you'll operate at a higher level when you get back to your workspace." — Jorge Cruise, "FitSmart Music + movement = better brainpower", USA Weekend, Mar 11, 2005

"Lots of people are closet pickers. I'm really lucky to have [my band] — six people who want to make music together two nights a week. That's something for me to think about the next time someone sings off-key." — Bob Dolan

"If your band doesn't have someone who could make it past the first cut on American Idol, then you don't really have a lead singer." — Bob Dolan

"How had I so completely forgotten the wisdom I learned in my youth? Like the wonderful advice of Thumper's mom: 'If you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all.' Or Bing Crosby: 'Accentuate the positive; eliminate the negative.' Or Miss Julie: 'Don't be a don't-bee; do be a do-bee.' Or Frank Sinatra: 'Do be do be do.' — Tom Smart, "Seventeen Habits of Highly Effective Jammers", Intermountain Acoustic Musician, March, 2005

"After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music." — Aldous Huxley, contributed by Stuart Tarbuck

"I didn't have that thing about, 'Oh, you're talented. That means you must practice four hours a day.' I just grew up and I played. I played for my friends, and I mucked around, basically. One of my great fortunes was not being trained too much." — Pianist Joanna MacGregor, quoted by Kyle MacMillan, "7 Days", the Denver Post, Feb. 18, 2005

"He claimed he had all my albums. I was wondering what happened to them." — Tom Rush at Swallow Hill, Jan. 15, 2005

"I can't read music or carry a tune, but I have a great ear, which I got from my mother, who was a concert pianist." — Pierre Cossette, producer of every Grammy show, from "Personality Parade", Parade Magazine, Feb. 13, 2005

"So much of human expression is longing. You're trying to go toward something—some sort of vision....You hope that we all want to go toward a bigger place than self-interest." — Yo-Yo Ma in "We Are the World" by Gerri Hirshey, Parade Magazine, Jan.30, 2005

"If you want me to be really obedient, I can do that, but it means absolutely not finding my own voice. If you want me to be a good musician, it means I have to go deeply into myself to find out." — Yo-Yo Ma in "We Are the World" by Gerri Hirshey, Parade Magazine, Jan.30, 2005

"There comes a time in every weekly or monthly open jam when the sheer cacophony becomes so overwhelming that you go home feeling just plain depressed...
"CONTRIBUTE TO THE ENSEMBLE SOUND, OR SHUT THE HELL UP!...
"If you're not the soloist, your job is to help the soloist sound his or her best. Your job is to offer rhythmic support. If there are 10 people in the jam, that means the spotlight may only be on you 1/10 of the time. Can't handle that? Then go play alone in your living room, where you can be the center of attention 100 percent of the time. Or else just get another hobby." — Tom Smart, "Why Some Jams Are So Bad, and What You Can Do to Help Fix Them", Intermountain Acoustic Musician

"A lot of music fans have gotten over the trauma, real or imagined, of hearing their favorite songs in TV Commercials.
"It's a practice that used to be a cultural line in the sand — either you sold out your songs to peddle products or you didn't...
"With the music industry broken beyond repair, no one begrudges an artist anymore for getting their songs heard (and picking up some cash) any way they can, whether a new act or a veteran.
"...But what's still jarring, even after hundreds of commercials, is hearing something taken out of context and made to mean something entirely different...
"Intentional irony is a different matter....Not getting the point of a song isn't a new thing...With the careful editing that For the Love Of Money got, however, someone knew exactly what the song meant, and how to make it mean something else [as the theme song for The Apprentice]." — Mark Brown, The Rocky Mountain News, Jan. 22, 2005

"There's a word for folk singers who encourage sing-alongs. They're called 'Kumbayahoos'." — Andy Wilkinson at the Colorado Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Jan. 15, 2005

"There are some things that just aren't done: drinking Dom Perignon above the temperature of 38 degrees Fahrenheit and listening to the Beatles without ear muffs." — Sean Connery as James Bond in Goldfinger

"[William] Shatner has released his first album in more than 35 years!
"The cover alone should earn this man a Grammy nomination.
"There is Shatner, with his head in his hands, looking like he's about to throw up. (Perhaps he just listened to his album for the first time.)...It's that bleak.
"And, why not? The album title says it all: 'Has Been.'" — Don Flood, "Shatner Explores New World of Recording", in Tidbits of Northern El Paso County, November 8, 2004

"For those too young to remember [Jack] Webb's vocal qualities, try to imagine a cement mixer with a severe chest cold, puffing on a cigarette — singing 'Try a Little Tenderness.'
"Well, Webb is nowhere near that good, but it does give you an idea of where he stands in history of music." — Don Flood, "Shatner Explores New World of Recording", in Tidbits of Northern El Paso County, November 8, 2004

"A day without music is worse than a day without sunshine" — Mike Dudley

"Gwen Stefani's solo debut is pointless pop.....an 8-bit Atari video game soundtrack after five bowls of Lucky Charms mixed with espresso. And the bleacher-pounding beat in the hip-hop pep rally mutation ... isn't ghetto fabulous. It's just annoying." — Derrik J. Lang in "Stefani serves up sugar pops on first solo CD", The Denver Post, November 23, 2004

"You don't like playing scales? Practice them until you love them." — Andres Segovia
— contributed by J. C. at Acoustic Music Revival

"The difference between a guitar and an electric guitar is the same as the difference between a chair and an electric chair." — Andres Segovia
— contributed by J. C. at Acoustic Music Revival

"Such has been my success at renouncing G chords and Cat Stevens that I missed my fifth anniversary of conceding once and for all that I can't Pied-Piper my way into a woman's heart. This forgotten recovery snapped at my face like a broken E string, recently when a beer commercial, as it so often does, played my life back to me.
"No, I'm not going to start drinking Miller Lite, but there's nothing more clever on TV than the company's football-referee ads. ... a bearded bohemian strums and sings for his female companions around a campfire until a referee appears from the woods and penalizes him for 'musical romanticism ... Invitation to tent ... declined!' The women exchange giggles, and the guitarist mutters, 'Chicks dig music.'
"No doubt they do. Yet recovery has forced me to admit that most women only pretend to like diabetic interpretations of James Taylor and the Beatles." — Vic Vogler, "A Guy Thing, Striking the wrong chord with women", The Denver Post, Nov. 14, 2004

"I admire people I can learn from." — Willie Nelson, "LifeQuestionsWith...", Life Magazine, Nov. 12, 2004

"'Seduced by the dark side of the force'? That's how I got into radio." — said by a DJ on KIMN radio, Nov. 9, 2004

"You should reap the rewards of his good grades. (After all, you put up with his music.)" — Allstate Insurance Ad, November, 2004

"The essential ingredients for playing and singing the blues are 'juice and pain.' So says Bonnie Raitt... By juice, Raitt doesn't necessarily mean booze but the raw life force (often booze-stoked) that surges through the music of the blues legends..." — Stephen Holden, The New York Times, reprinted in the Denver Post, Nov. 5, 2004

"These Huge Holidays? Just another way of forcibly redistributing wealth, kind of a gentle Marxism, but with better music." — Denis Boyles, "LifeEtc.", AARP magazine, November / December 2004

" If [the Raspberries] were to put together a greatest hits album, they'd be hard-pressed to fill up both sides of a single." — Don Flood, "Easy Come, Easy Go" in Tidbits of Northern El Paso County, Oct. 25, 2004

"Perhaps Saturday Night Live should be most ashamed, given the third word in its name. Even MTV Unplugged has standards; everything had to be played live and there were no overdubs. Musicians from Bob Dylan to Rod Stewart had no problem with this.
"But in order to put on the likes of Jennifer Lopez and Ashlee Simpson, SNL has diluted its standards to the point where the lip-syncing has been obvious for years.
"...It's the shows and media that pander to such fraud who look stupid now." — Mark Brown, Rocky Mountain News, October 30, 2004

"Visionary.... Cultural icon.... Creative pathfinder.
"Such terms get thrown around a lot in our marketing-happy era. But in the case of Laurie Anderson, they hit the mark.
"The New York artist, composer, poet, photographer and filmmaker has embodied the American avant-garde since the 1970s, bucking categories, transcending boundaries and refusing to be pinned down.
"In fact, if the arts world has a reigning Renaissance man, Anders, 57, is proving that it's actually a woman.
"'I kind of made up this combination,' she said by phone from a hotel in Pittsburgh. 'I just never decided exactly what to do, which works out really well for me.'" — Kyle Macmillan, "New horizons for her arts", the Denver Post, October 31, 2004

"[Casey Verbeck] brings a whole new approach to what it is we're doing here. And his careful building of Yonder Mountain has been a textbook case on how to build a band. What's [sic] he's done for them has been really amazing — I mean come on, promoting a band with no drummer?" — Chuck Morris, in "VERBECK: Peers laud and envy manager", the Denver Post, October 24, 2004

"Asked how he felt about being called a legend at this stage in his career, [Brian Wilson] said, 'I listen to the word legend, and I think of a person who has established his name around the country ...I was never hung up on people calling me that.'" — "Legends: Folk hero, surfer boy share paths to stardom", Denver Post, October 24, 2004

"Not only did I not want (the fame), but I didn't need it. I couldn't understand it either. None of us like to be defined by what other people think of us. I wasn't the toastmaster of any generation, and that notion has to be pulled up by the roots." — Bob Dylan, in "Legends: Folk hero, surfer boy share paths to stardom", Denver Post, October 24, 2004

"From what I understand, [Bob Dylan] has no nostalgia whatsoever. There's no looking back. It's all about looking forward. For him personally, I think there's little if any interest in what's gone before. He understands that he's had this serious impact, although I don't know that he spends a lot [of] time thinking about it." — Jasen Emmons, curator at the Experience Music Project in Seattle, in "Legends: Folk hero, surfer boy share paths to stardom", Denver Post, October 24, 2004

"Pat Benatar: rocker, vixen—hearing aid spokeswoman? When we heard that the belter of such power-chord classics as "Promises in the Dark" was focusing on eardrums rather than drum solos, we wondered if this signaled the start of once-hip rock stars taking up noble-but-depressingly-unhip causes. But the campaign, sponsored in part by Energizer, is surprisingly tongue-in-cheek. 'Of all the rock stars that could send fans to a hearing health professional,' the campaign states, 'only Pat Benatar is doing it intentionally.' So why is she doing it? 'Many of my friends have suffered permanent hearing damage,' says the sultry Benatar, 51. We give her bravery points for addressing an issue that won't get her on MTV. Our predictions: 1) More rock stars will promote over-50 health issues and 2) Keith Richards won't be one of them." — Barbara Lippert in "Media Watchdog Hit Me With Your Best...What?", AARP the magazine, November / December 2004

"Music has a subliminal effect on us. It has the ability to transform us and take us places, just like good sex. You might want to think twice about putting on that throbbing techno dance music if you want to hear the sweet nothings your lover's whispering in your ear." — Candida Royale, "How to Tell a Naked Man What to Do", reprinted in "Sexcerpts", Rocky Mountain News, October 16, 2004

"Sandy Frey sent in an Easton (Md.) Star Democrat story about residents of Oxford, Md., complaining about loud rock music, with one resident quoted as saying:,[sic] 'They had no right to go boom, boom, boom in my ear in that honky-tonk fashion.'" — Dave Barry, "Mr. Language Person says semicolons prop up pianos and sentences", The Denver Post, October 10, 2004

"My philosophy is very close to what [Daniel] Pearl always believed in. The power of music can bring people together. It's why I do what I do." — Kailin Yong, quoted by Marc Shulgold in "Music world unites in tribute to slain reporter", Rocky Mountain News, October 6, 2004

"In 1947 Warner Imig, a young music professor at the University of Colorado, formed a controversial singing group that nearly cost him his job.
"Debuting in Macky Auditorium, Imig's bold Modern Choir belted out contemporary musical arrangements inspired by American folk and jazz songs. Based on his colleagues' shocked response, Imig might as well have declared himself a communist. The dean of music walked out of the performance, and the faculty debated censuring him.
"'You didn't sing jazz or folk music,' Imig ... recalls ... '...you didn't sing music all of the people out there were singing.'" — Tori Peglar in "The Legacy of Warner Imig", Coloradoan, Sept. 2004

"Generally, a band will feature the usual ho-hum instruments: guitar, bass, drums. Why settle for a bland lineup when the Boulder Acoustic Society can wow and amaze, if not confuse, with the odd grouping of guitar, upright bass, ukulele, xylophone and violin?...
"'It's freeing, actually. Because we've got all of these weird styles and instruments, we don't have to sound like anyone else.'" — "BandUndStrum", Colorado Springs Independent, Aug. 26, 2004

"I don't have a day job. I have a lifestyle." — Mo Walker of The Clam Daddys

"The cello is becoming rock's nerd-turned-prom-queen. Sure, she's the belle of the ball in The Beatles classic 'Eleanor Rigby.' But few contemporary groups in the head-nodding, torn-jeans set have exploited the instrument's rock'n'roll potential." — Elana Ashanti Jefferson, The Denver Post, Sept. 3, 2004

"What's interesting about Bobby is, you say 'Bobby Darin' to people of this generation and they cock their heads, but then you sing four bars of 'Splish Splash' or 'Mac the Knife' and they go, 'Oh! Bobby Darin!' Still, it was very difficult to get the movie made because the American movie studios hold this odd belief that people will go to see biographical movies only about people they already know." — Kevin Spacey, in "One Life to Give", AARP the Magazine, September / October 2004

"Powers said it was during the mid-'90s that his longtime flirtation with music developed into a serious involvement with the post-punk scene, one that bordered on obsession.
"'If he wasn't at a show or a record store, he was at home listening to music.' [a] friend ... said. 'Music and Sam were inseparable." — "Lifelong Love Affair With Music Ends At Age 35" in the Relationships column of the Onion, Volume 40, Number 30

"...a softer, gentler side of music is coming to the fore, one that's as traditional as it is contemporary. Call it the new folk.
"More of a shared sensibility than a formalized genre or movement, it's being woven together by a growing collection of young artists from strains of bluegrass and jazz, country and blues and even vaudeville into stripped-down songs that sound strangely outside the present era." — Susan Carpenter, in "A softer, gentler kind of cutting edge" in the Denver Post, Tuesday, July 22, 2004

"The search for Americana presses on though, no rest on the quest. Doc Watson sounds as good as can be expected coming out of 3 of 4 speakers (we lost one along the way)." — In search of AMericana. A KCUV road trip

"There is Carol. She's trying to figure out where we are. We're lost but we know we're getting closer to Americana. We can feel it. We've got the windows rolled down and Alison Krauss turned up while we wait for Carol to save us." — In search of AMericana. A KCUV road trip

"I don't know anything about music. In my line you don't have to." — Elvis Presley

"I saw this on the Gibson site while I was looking for something else. 'Lyrics - wasted time between solos.'" — Tom Stuart

"...without music, life is a journey through a desert..." — Pat Conroy, Beach Music

"My idea of hell is to be caught in an airport lounge during a snow storm, listening to an aging hippie songstress whacking away at her scratched-up Martin guitar as she plays 'Blowin' in the Wind,' 'Puff the Magic Dragon,' 'I Gave My Love a Cherry,' 'Lemon Tree' and 'We Shall Overcome' in that order." — Pat Conroy, Beach Music

"My child held me as the song her mother and I had loved best in the world completely undid me. I could bear the memory, but I could not bear the music that made the memory such a killing thing." — Pat Conroy, Beach Music

"Dear Annie: My 15-year-old daughter learned to pay bluegrass mandolin from her father. While playing at a recent family get-together, she strummed the old song 'Jessie James,' and surprisingly, my 82-year-old stepfather began to sing. When he noticed our reaction, he said, 'My great-uncle was a stagecoach rider and taught me that song when I was a little boy.' Annie, please tell your readers to spend some time listening to our elders and documenting what they remember. We are losing one of America's most precious commodities — our history. — The Farmer's Stepdaughter" — Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, in "Annie's Mailbox", The Denver Post, July 1, 2004

"Progressive Delights — That's what playing the bass has brought me. Don't know who but a couple of bass players could talk about being 'delighted' by a chord progression. The thrill of discovery lives in the relative minor. Who'd a thunk it?" — Bob Dolan

"The idea of Nirvana without Kurt Cobain is ludicrous. It's stupid and nonsensical. Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic know that. You know that. The most rudimentary music fan knows a band is not a band after it loses its heart, its soul, its voice, its philosophical or musical foundation." — Riccardo Baca in The Denver Post, June 18, 2004

"Not that the dial tone is without its own inherent music. It's actually a combination of two frequencies. This is important—as Leonard Bernstein said, an isolated note is simply 'floating in space.' Paired with another, it takes on meaning and emotional resonance. In this case, the two frequencies form an approximate major third — a sound generally associated with contentment." — William Weir of The Hartford Courant in "At-risk dial tone rings a bell in the psyche", The Denver Post, June 21, 2004

"Note to Self: Don't use Bela Fleck for break music ...makes the audience look forward to the breaks." — Bob Dolan

"The notes I play are influenced by the notes I want to play next." — Bob Dolan

When told by a female fan that he was the "Kid Rock of bluegrass", Armando Zuppa replied, "Yeah, I'm Ban-Jovi."

"I'm on the Chet Atkins diet: you just pick at your food." — Tom Stuart

"A tape Robin had picked up at McCabe's was in the deck: a teenager named Alison Krause, singing bluegrass in a voice as sweet and clear as first love and running off fiddle solos that had the wondrous ease of the prodigy." — Jonathan Kellerman, Bad Love (1994)

"I think that before we're born, we're in some kind of paradise. Then we're dropped down here to live. But we're used to paradise, so this place is very painful. To ease the pain, we're given two things: music and humor..." — Stephan Pastis, Denver Post, March 7, 2004

"Now wait a minute. Ada adored her piano, hated to let it go. But she was facing the prospect of starvation. I'd sell my piano if it were my only source of cash for food.
"I would die of hunger before I unloaded my acoustic guitar, though." — Marc Shulgold in "Feel the music — please!", Feb. 21, 2004 Rocky Mountain News

"Every now and then I listen to a piece of music, and it kills me. ...the emotion, the beauty of it all. ...wherever it is. My body just reacts to it. And I say to myself, God, I'm so lucky that I am able to experience this. That feeling has never gone away." — Itzhak Perlman, AARP Jan.&Feb, 2004

"The best song you'll ever hear is nothing more than corrected mistakes." — Duke Brown

"Bob Wills meets Frank Zappa! ...wacky weirdness built largely upon satire and parody. Dr. Demento meets Bill Monroe." — Joe Ross, Intermountain Acoustic Musician, April 2004, in a review of the Austin Lounge Lizards new CD, "Strange Noises in the Dark"

"God does not charge time spent pickin against a man's allotted life span." — sign seen at Olde Town Pickin' Parlor

A musician copes with time: "I can't play golf with you at 7 tomorrow morning. I can't stay up that late." — Warren Floyd

"It's hard to get too far from bluegrass once you get it in your blood." — David Grisman, at taping of etown, November 16, 2003

"It's not all about a lot of fast notes."
"Not at our age."
"It's about pain and suffering." — David Grisman and Sam Bush, intro to Weeping Mandolin Waltz, at taping of etown, November 16, 2003

"Dolly Parton is bluegrass now. They're crossing over. Too bad we left." — David Grisman referring to himself and Sam Bush, at taping of etown, November 16, 2003

"They should teach bluegrass and other American music in the schools. It should be mandatory." — David Grisman, at taping of etown, November 16, 2003

"I dig pretty. I don't like wild and crazy jazz." — Wes Bowen, per Bangs Tapscott, Intermountain Acoustic Musician, October, 2003

"I love that for an epitaph, 'I dig pretty.' Don't give me no ugly music, no matter how 'important' or 'cutting edge' it may be: 'I dig pretty.' Me, too." — Bangs Tapscott, Intermountain Acoustic Musician, October, 2003

"[Being a musician] is a road, not a destination. The word p. e. r. f. e. c. t. is a transitive verb, not an adjective." — Dan Crary

"...I was haunted by the weirdness of his music. Knowing little of the art myself, I was yet certain that none of his harmonies had any relation to music I had heard before; and concluded that he was a composer of highly original genius." — H. P. Lovecraft, "The Music of Erich Zann"

"[Mariah] Carey's crime is against the art of American popular singing. She is a technical virtuoso, but her NutraSweet style of soul — sugary and artificial songs, crammed with hundreds of gratuitous notes — imparts nothing but self-interest." — G. Brown, The Denver Post, August 10, 2003

"Young singers follow a tactic of violent Carey emulation — don't hold back from trilling eighth notes where one would be enough. That particular vocal mannerism is called melisma." — G. Brown, The Denver Post, August 10, 2003

"I have a huge respect for Beyonce Knowles of Destiony's Child — the melismatic runs that she uses are incredibly precise, almost perfect in a classical sense. But at the same time, I think they've taken away from the original melodies." — Celeste Delgado per G. Brown, The Denver Post, August 10, 2003

"Rap is the only music business where people die." — Adam Roybal per Eric Hubler, The Denver Post, August 10, 2003

"To ... the man who taught me that love could be more fun than work, that music is the voice of the soul, and that lunch should last forever." — Jimmy Buffett, Tales From Margaritaville

The Rolling Stones tell their story—we're impressed they can still remember it—in According to the Rolling Stones (Chronicle Books), a music memoir based on archival material and new interviews with the band." — AARP The Magazine, September / October 2003

"Music ain't nothing to be pretentious about." — Rebecca Calhoun, aka Farin Dekker

They don't call him 'Ramblin' Jack because he travels around a lot." — Guy Clark at Swallow Hill Music Association, May 31, 2003

"Of all the wonders of nature, a tree in summer is perhaps the most remarkable; with the possible exception of a moose singing 'Embraceable You' in spats." — Woody Allen (thanks to Wendy Wham)

"That was extraordinary. Unfortunately, extraordinarily bad." — Simon Cowell, American Idol

"My advice would be if you want to pursue a career in the music business, don't." — Simon Cowell, American Idol

"...it's hard to describe 'why' when they want to know what sets [The Walnut Valley Festival] apart. But you know its Love, plain and simple, the sweet spirit of the people who have made this festival what is today. The plain ole down home people that come together once a year for a reunion of family and friends and listen to the best foot-stompin' music in the country." — Karen Lee, in the Walnut Valley Occasional, Dec. 2002

"Of chorus we will." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"This is a Neil Young free zone." — Bob Turner, at Celtic Crossing, May 9, 2003

"So whaddya think, is Earl Scruggs a blessed man or what? It rained a monsoon for two days in L. A. last week, but stopped on Thursday just in time for Earl to stay dry and enjoy ceremonies to honor him with a star in the Hollywood Walk of Fame. When the festivities ended, the skies opened up and it rained again. This helps prove my long-held belief that even God loves to hear Earl Scruggs pick the banjo." — Bangs Tapscott, Intermountain Acoustic Musician, May 2003

"Music is the only thing that constantly never ceases to always never fail to constantly never cease." — Andrew Gold, contributed by Bob Cooke

"Usually I'm flat. I'm coming up in the world." — Ranger Jane Leche upon hearing that she would need to re-record a line that was a little sharp.

"[I'm] dancing! ...to the same music the leaves are dancing to!!!" — Lynn Johnston, For Better or Worse

"...a cross between Karl Shiflett and Frank Zappa..." — Sweet Sunny South, 2003 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"...where the bluegrass grows short and the other grass grows indoors." — Bill Powers, 2003 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"Panhandle Rag is just Steel Guitar Rag played backward." — Byron Berline, 2003 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"It's called D Minor Swing, in the key of..." — Byron Berline
"...F" — Dennis Caplinger and John Moore, 2003 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"Turn it up to 11. Whatever their number is, I wanna be 1 higher." — Dennis Caplinger, 2003 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"It's a solo banjo introduction, a rare thing. Beethoven thought of doing it, but his wife wouldn't let him." — Bill Evans, 2003 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"Have your music and eat it too." — Mark Epstein on a proposed bluegrass cookbook

"It's kinda like an Irish tune. It's a tune about food." — Uwe Kruger at the Olde Town Pickin' Parlor

"They booked us for the redneck factor." — Uwe Kruger at the Olde Town Pickin' Parlor

"My big fat Greek bluegrass band." — Uwe Kruger at the Olde Town Pickin' Parlor

"Music has something to offer, but it does not come to you. You have to come to it. And when you do, you will walk away with something that you did not have before - something that no one can take from you. " — Wynton Marsalis
— contributed by Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Mark Merryman Mark Merryman: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"The perfect bluegrass song has one chord, is about Kentucky, and contains the word 'lonesome'." — Aaron Woking, 2003 MidWinter Bluegrass Festival

"Winning a banjo is like winning an all-expense paid trip to Purgatory." — Aaron Woking, 2003 MidWinter Bluegrass Festival

"If this don't set you on fire, then your wood's all wet." — Hereford Percy, 2003 MidWinter Bluegrass Festival

"Love is like a violin. The music may stop now and then, but the strings remain forever." — June Masters Bacher

"Going to war without France is like going deer hunting without your accordion." — Norman Schwartzkopf

"If we're gonna play this cowboy [stuff], I'm gonna have to play slower." — Tony Rice to Norman Blake during the recording process

"It is the imperfections that make music interesting." — Butch Hause at the Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers CBMS Colorado Bluegrass Music Society: Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Music Promoters Colorado Bluegrass Musicians Symposium, Feb 1, 2003

"Love is friendship set to music." — E. Joseph Crossman in Colorado Country Life, Feb. 2003

"Why should you never live with a bass player? Because they always come in late and they can never find the key." — Lucien Holmes, Portland, ME

"Imagine having fun while learning to control yourself! We do that in Kindermusik classes when we listen to music which has sudden stops - we stop dancing when the music stops, and dance again when the music starts again. We are responding to cues and learning inhibitory control." — Patty Evans, in "Kindermusik - A Musical Child Development Experience" Exclusively For Women January 2003

"I'm learning more and more that I don't have to neurotically fill up every measure of a solo with notes—a lot of what I've learned over the past ten years amounts to knowing what not to play, how to refrain from playing five notes where one sounds best." — Ron Block, in bluegrass now, July 2001

Sorry, but I couldn't resist this one: "Corecttion[sic]: The April 2001 review of Foxtower project "Tower Grass" misidentified the bowing instrument in the Song [sic] 'White River Dreams' as a base[sic]; instead, the band's fiddler is playing a violoa[sic]." — "inside bluegrass" from bluegrass now, July 2001

"In Bristol, Tennessee, visit the Grand Guitar, a 70-foot long, 3-story high guitar that houses WOPI, the region's oldest radio station, in addition to a country and western museum. The guitar itself has frets, nylon ropes acting as strings, a sound hole that is actually a window in the museum, and a Martin insignia on the handle. The Grand Guitar was built to honor all the country-western singers that hail from the area, such as Dolly Parton, Chet Atkins, Roy Acuff, Andy Griffith, and Ronnie Milsap." — "Music Museums" in Southeast Tidbits, November 11, 2002

"In Las Vegas, visit the Liberace Museum. In his day, Liberace was the world's most highest paid musician, and at this museum you can gawk at a selection of his possessions. ...There are 18 of the 40 pianos he owned displayed here, including on antique piano once played by Chopin at Versailles. Another model is completely covered with Austrian rhinestones, and yet another is covered with thousands of etched mirrors (it matches his mirror-covered Rolls Royce, which is also on display). His collection of miniature pianos includes one made from 10,000 toothpicks and another made from fused nickels. You can even admire his heaviest costume: an outfit made of mink and rhinestones that weighs 200 pounds" — "Music Museums" in Southeast Tidbits, November 11, 2002

"Music is not only the soundtrack of our lives; sometimes it's the script as well....Music speaks not only about where we are in our lives...but of how far we've come." — Barbara Hey, "Changing Verses Tell Tale in Song", the Denver Post, Sept. 24, 2002

"If they don't have bluegrass in heaven, I'm not going." — Kit Mullins

"The blues aren't about making you feel better. The blues are about making everyone else feel as bad as you." — heard on KQMT "The Mountain" 99.5 Oct. 4, 2002

"Too many notes per kilowatt" — Tommy Emmanuel at Swallow Hill Music Association, Sept. 27, 2002

"It's a Gibson. They're user-friendly." — Tommy Emmanuel at Swallow Hill Music Association, Sept 27, 2002

"My parents gave me guitar for my fourth birthday and a 78 record of Guitar Boogie. They said, 'You work it out.' and I did. Took me 25 years." — Tommy Emmanuel at Swallow Hill Music Association, Sept. 27, 2002

"Beethoven this ain't" — John Stump, "Faerie's Aire and Death Waltz"

"Return instrument if it says 'Mattel' (R)" — John Stump, "Faerie's Aire and Death Waltz"

"It's said that the it's the space between the bars that holds the tiger. It's not the notes, but what's between that makes the music." — Mary Van Becelaere, "Leaving Places for Space" in Exclusively For Women, August Vol. 3 Issue 35

"When in doubt, rush." — John McEuen on playing bluegrass

"When the powers that be in the music industry start spending as much money and effort solving problems as fighting the symptoms, we'll all be a lot better off." — Brian Austin Whitney

"A friend bears the song in my heart and sings it to me when my memory fails." — Unknown, in Exclusively For Women, July Vol. 3 Issue 34

"Life's too short to play cheap instruments." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Sandy Reay Sandy Reay: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats." — Albert Schweitzer, seen on Bill Donaldson's t-shirt

"Most of us go to our grave with our music still inside of us." — unknown

"Studies show that when people listen to music, their brains secrete many of the same neuro-chemicals secreted when they take drugs, eat chocolate, and have sex." — Patricia Nagele, CMP, "Healing With Music" in Exclusively For Women, July Vol. 3 Issue 34

"Friends don't let friends play fast... Now, I'm not opposed to speed; I play fast myself. Sometimes, I play very fast. But I'm against sloppy, awkward, excessive, unnecessary speed, which is toxic to music. An overabundance of notes can flow into measures like an oil spill into a river, clogging and choking the life out of the music." — Artie Traum in the Taylor Guitar Fall, 2001, newsletter

"Due to heightened security at the airports, traveling musicians are not allowed to return with unsold CDs." — Chris Jones at the 2002 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"Bill Monroe had a banjo player named Stringbean. In the early days, all banjo players were named after vegetables." — Chris Jones at the 2002 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"We all know that the Father of Bluegrass music was Bill Monroe. But did you know that the Mother of Bluegrass music was Marilyn Monroe?" — Chris Jones at the 2002 Durango Bluegrass Meltdown

"Home, home in this range" — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets, on the correct key for the singer

"I jazz chord to say 'I love you'" — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"Pickin' in the Pines" has been affectionately renamed "Pickin' on the Mimes" by Ron Cohen, one of Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Colorado Bluegrass Music Society's "Cohen Brothers" (dubbed that by board prez B. J. Suter BJ Suter: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets)

"I think a lot of radio programmers are probably holding their breath right now (and thinking), 'This is going to pass.' Maybe it won't this time. They might actually have to play the songs on their stations." — Barry Bales, after "O Brother Where Art Thou?" won 5 Grammys, as reported in the Denver Post, March 3, 2002

"The simple and beautiful idea of a songline is that music is the way to measure time. Life is a journey that's measured not in miles or years but in experiences, and the route your life takes is built not of roads but of songs. How far is it from Key West to Miami? To some it is 147 miles. To me, it is about eleven songs." — Jimmy Buffet, A Pirate Looks at Fifty

"This next song is in B. That's B for erotic." — Sally Van Meter at the Boulder Theatre, Dec. 31, 2001

"You've heard off the doghouse bass? Well, this is the puphouse bass." — Sam Bush referring to Byron House's electric upright bass at the Boulder Theatre, Dec. 31, 2001

"...Pam is a bit of a rebel. Mom always says she marches to the beat of a different drummer. Dad says she left the percussion section behind a long time ago." — John Allen in "Nest Heads", The Denver Post, Dec. 5, 2002

"I noticed the other [musician], the one who should never get locked out cause he could never find the key." — Bill Donaldson

"Where words fail, music speaks." — Hans Christian Andersen

"[W]e start real quiet, and then peter out altogether." — The Kingston Trio, as reported by Joanne Davidson in the Denver Post, Dec 21, 2001

"I read on another list about a person doing Random Acts of Music. Custom compiled CD's for the Holidays distributed by leaving it lying about for others to find. It had a note the said 'Go ahead, take it, it's Free.'" — found in an e-mail entitled "Random Acts of Kindness"

"It's a well-kept secret that there are really only four tunes in old-time music: the G Tune, the A Tune, the D Tune, and the C Tune. It's an even better-kept secret that these four tunes sound exactly the same." — Jim Rosenstock in "The Doc Stock Banjo Method or Any Jerk Can Play the Banjo so Why Not You Too?"

"Tablature is a simplified form of musical notation used by musicians to preserve music on paper. Avoid all tablature—you will get nowhere as a banjo player by imitating musicians." — Jim Rosenstock in "The Doc Stock Banjo Method or Any Jerk Can Play the Banjo so Why Not You Too?"

"A capo allows the banjo player, once out of tune in one key, to quickly be out of tune in any other key." — Jim Rosenstock in "The Doc Stock Banjo Method or Any Jerk Can Play the Banjo so Why Not You Too?"

"Music, I suppose, will be the thing that sustains me in the time of my life when I am too old for sex and not quite ready to meet God." — Dolly Parton, in "Hello, Dolly!", Chicken Soup for the Woman's Soul

"I was content to play first position chords, but this guy I used to play music with said, 'Well, you bought the whole neck...'" — Mark McKeever

"If they go to Barry Manilow, it's excessive force." — Hostage expert Peter DiVasto, on the FBI's musical bombardment of the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, with Nancy Sinatra's "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'", Mitch Miller Christmas carols and Tibetan chants, from Newsweek.

"You know, on that second bridge, I like what you were trying to do." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"That's pretty bad, but not as bad as last Thursday. We called it the day of the banjo. Then there was Friday, the day of the missing banjo."—Dennis Finch on "Just Shoot Me"

"Kind words are sweet tones of the heart." — Joseph L. Townsend in Dear Abby in the Denver Post, Nov. 18, 2001

"My kid finishes his homework so fast, I'm worried he'll start a band. " — Encarta Reference Library 2002 advertisement

"We don't like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out." — Decca Recording Co. rejecting the Beatles, 1962

"The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?" — David Sarnoff's associates in response to his urging for investment in the radio in the 1920s

"Paul Briggs sent in an Associated Press article concerning a referendum to ban alcohol sales in Fairhope Township, PA., in which a resident is quoted as making the following allegation about the town's only bar, Hillbilly Haven: 'Some nights, I think they have those teriyaki songs'." — Dave Barry, The Denver Post 9/30/01

"There are no bad notes, just bad choices." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Ernie Martinez Ernie Martinez: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians
"Ernie's never heard me play upright bass." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Sandy Reay Sandy Reay: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"Here is an insult I made up upon hearing a singer whose style I found grating: If she had performed in the Ford Theatre, she might have saved Abraham Lincoln's life." — Peter Schwimmer Peter Schwimmer: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"Writing about music is like dancing about architecture." — Anonymous

"I grew up listening to the classics: Bill Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs, the Stanley Brothers." — Ricky Skaggs, at WestFest in Steamboat Springs, Sept. 2, 2001

"Ability to play the banjo soon places one in a social position to pick and choose from scores of social invitations. Everywhere, the banjoist is assured of a hearty welcome." — THE BANJO, 1927 pamphlet published by Gibson, Inc.

"Read the words off the back of my mind." — Peter Rowan to Del McCoury at the 2001 RockyGrass Academy

"Organizing musicians is like herding cats" — Duke Professor James Boyle

"Bad music will make you weak." — Ry Cooder

"Listening to the fifth symphony of Ralph Vaughan Williams is like staring at at cow for forty-five minutes." — Aaron Copeland (from the April 2001 Intermountain Acoustic Musician)

"It wouldn't be a dog eat dog world in the music industry if occasionally the dogs got thrown a bone." — Brian Austin Whitney

"So many notes, so little time." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Sandy Reay Sandy Reay: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

Seen on a t-shirt at the 2001 Western Colorado Memorial Day Weekend Bluegrass Festival: "Go Home and Practice"

Seen on a button at the 2001 Western Colorado Memorial Day Weekend Bluegrass Festival: "Thanks for not laughing at my break"

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs... There's also a negative side." — Hunter S. Thompson, from the Feb. 2001 Intermountain Acoustic Musician

"Today, like every other day, we wake up empty and frightened. Don't open the door to the study and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument. Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground." — Rumi, translated by Coleman Barks, from the Spring 2001 Swallow Hill Music Association Quarterly

"We live in an age of music for people who don't like music. The record industry discovered some time ago that there aren't that many people who actually like music. For a lot of people, music's annoying, or at the very least they don't need it. They discovered if they could sell music to a lot of those people, they could sell a lot more records." — T Bone Burnett, LA Times

"Modern music is people who can't think signing artists who can't write songs to make records for people who can't hear." — Frank Zappa

"The trill is gone." — Jim Ratts

"If you can't play something nice, don't play anything at all." — Founders: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Places to Hear Acoustic Music, Locations, Venues, Clubs, Festivals, Business and Services Supporting Acoustic Music, Music Stores, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers Sandy Reay Sandy Reay: Bands, Singers, Songwriters, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians

"Minor chords are a major source of joy." — Jim Ratts of Runaway Express Runaway Express: Bands, Singers, Songwriters / Composers, Solo Performers, Sidemen, Instrumentalists, Performers, Entertainers, Musicians, Cowboy Poets

"When she started to play, Steinway himself came down personally and rubbed his name off the piano." — Bob Hope, about comedienne Phyllis Diller

"I'm told that Wagner's music not as bad as sounds." — Mark Twain

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